Visiting Colleges: A National Journey

collegeahead

It seems at this point in my college process, I think of the states not by name, but by what colleges I’ve visited. So instead of Ohio, Maryland, Vermont, Massachusettes and California; its Oberlin, Kenyon, Johns Hopkins, Goucher, Middlebury, University of Vermont, Wheaton, Pitzer and Occidental to name only a few. Continue reading

Entering the Common App: The College Admissions Process

graduation

Well, it has finally begun. After three years of college being no more than a hypothetical for me, the common app has finally kickstarted the very real college admissions process. It’s somewhat terrifying to go into a virtual pen with hundreds of thousands of other students armed only with a few numbers, a list of activities, and a 650-word essay that is supposed to define who I am as a person.

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The SAT and Me: A tutoring Experience

Who knew three letters could engender (SAT word guys) so much fear in 11th graders nationwide? The SAT, bane of almost every junior in high school’s existence; the monster under our beds, and the test emphasized by almost everyone as one of the most important days of your school career. And as I soon learned, a completely learnable test.

SAT test

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SAT Tips to Ace Reading Comprehension

The SAT is all about confidence. Whether you’re learning tricks, memorizing vocabulary, or taking weekly practice exams, SAT/ACT preparation is about getting to know the exam and gaining confidence in your skills. Over the next few months, we’ll be revealing some of our top tutor tips, so stay tuned!

Reading Comprehension 101 – Underlining

sat reading tips

Reading comprehension questions on the SAT follow the same order as the events in the passage. While reading the passage, try to underline important details, key points, main ideas, and significant descriptions. When you get stuck on a question, underline key words in the answer choices you are deciding between, then go back to the part of the passage that relates to the question and look at what you underlined. Do you see matching words in the underlined area of the passage and anything you underlined in the answer choices? Or do you see synonyms? If so, you have a high contender for the right answer! Underlining helps you stay focused on what’s important in the passage. Matching underlined text between the passage and the answer choices lets you eliminate distractors and work with answer choices that relate directly to the passage.

What’s that sound? Ivy League Tutors Network joins Twitter.

It seems Ivy League Tutors is stumbling into the new age of social media. That’s right, we have a twitter account. If you’re ever looking for some interesting education related articles, news about ILTN, or pictures of our mascot Fifi the bowl cat, check in at http://twitter.com/Ivytutorsnet for all the latest.

Ivy League Tutors Network's mascot

Of all the comfortable places in our office where Fifi could get her daily 20 hours of sleep, she prefers this mixing bowl. We think it is the cutest thing. Stay tuned for more about Fifi-the-bowl-cat’s work day!

Making the Switch: My Private to Public School Transition; the SHSAT Journey

shsat journey

I had been in a private school setting all my life. Since the age of 5 I was situated at a K-12 manhattan private school where the teachers were called by their first names, where creative writing was a department by itself, and where classes were as small as 8 students to a teacher. I hadn’t considered — or even thought about — any kind of schooling other than the education I had received for nine years. But soon the benign elementary years fell to the more vicious middle school era, and after a few years in an environment where I felt increasingly isolated, I decided to look for other education options.

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Now Offering SAT, ACT, AP, Regents Mock Testing

 

sat testing

Practice makes perfect. Just ask the guy who scored a 2400 on the SAT for his number one SAT study tip and he will tell you, “Practice under test-day conditions.” While it sounds obvious to you, your 11th grader might be surprised by the importance of this SAT prep strategy. A Saturday morning spent in a classroom in July sounds like cruel and unusual punishment to most 17-year-olds. When everyone else is bragging about the top-secret, killer SAT strategies handed down from “the guy who invented the SAT,” it may seem like learning tricks is way more important than wasting all that time on practice tests.

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The Waiting Game

It’s April, and for many high school seniors, that means that the highly anticipated finale to the college admissions saga is just around the corner. But when that big, thick envelope arrives – the one that means yes – students might find themselves a bit surprised by what’s inside. Increasingly, according to a recent article in the New York Times, colleges are inviting students to wait a little longer and enroll in the spring. If you find yourself in those shoes, it is important to keep in mind that schools have all kinds of reasons for admitting students late. Moreover, many schools have implemented special programs for springtime latecomers that may end up putting them at an advantage over the average fall starter.

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SAT Returns to the Drawing Board…Again

The College Board recently announced to members of its board that it plans to redesign the SAT, but specifics on how and when the changes will occur remain unclear. The changes will be made in the 7-year wake of the last SAT overhaul, which took place in 2005 and featured the addition of a writing section and the removal of the much-derided analogy questions. While we have yet to see how these changes will impact the next generation of test takers, members of the education community have already begun speculating on how, why and when changes will be unveiled.

In his letter to College Board members, David Coleman, President of the College Board, wrote that the next changes would be made in the interest of “focusing on a core set of knowledge and skills that are essential to college and career success; reinforcing the practice of enriching and valuable schoolwork; fostering greater opportunities for students to make successful transitions into postsecondary education; and ensuring equity and fairness.”

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