Test-Taking Cements Knowledge Better Than Studying, Researchers Say – The New York Times

To Really Learn, Quit Studying and Take a Test

“I think that learning is all about retrieving, all about reconstructing our knowledge…

Source: Test-Taking Cements Knowledge Better Than Studying, Researchers Say – The New York Times

That’s why Ivy Tutors emphasizes taking diagnostic and practice tests at our test center. Schedule your SAT, ACT, SAT 2, SHSAT, SSAT, ISEE, SCAT or other standardized test with us now.

Here’s Why We Invest In Making Mock Testing Available For All Students

SAT tipsThis just happened: while our proctor was waiting for the last student to arrive to take a mock ACT test, the panicked father called to say they were running late. All streets were closed because of a half-marathon. They had abandoned their cab and were running pell-mell to the subway. “Would we please wait for her?” I told him it’s no problem and don’t get his daughter any more upset than she already was. I imagined she had spiraled down to: “I’m going to miss this test. Then I’ll do terribly on the actual test. I’ll never get into college. I’ll be a failure all my life…” Take a deep breath.

Taking a mock test at our test center has multiple benefits. Obviously it is a practice test. Like the old joke, how does a musician get to Carnegie Hall, improving your test scores is all about practice. That’s why our tutors encourage clients to do as many practice problems and tests as possible at home and at our test center. The latter simulates the actual test experience– as students stress to locate the place and arrive promptly, and then take a timed test with a proctor and other students, with only scheduled breaks.

Home testing is great for learning the material and implementing test strategies and tactics. But home gets distracting. Texts, Snapchat, the phone rings; the dog barks, the bee stings; an unscheduled bathroom break, the sibling’s challenge to a video game, the parent’s request to clean up a mess.

That’s why Ivy Tutors makes it a priority to offer mock SAT, ACT, and other standardized tests to our clients at our test center. Our proctors adhere to the official test timings, then correct and score the tests within 72 hours so the student can work on it with her tutor.

Plus, if the student is undecided whether to take the SAT or the ACT, she can take both at our test center and compare the process and results to determine which one she prefers.

So please call Ivy Tutors to schedule free practice tests for the test-taker in your home. Richard Kaplan, Executive Director  800-476-0596  www.ivyleaguetutors.net  richard@ivytutorsnetwork.com  

Tell Me More About the New SAT & ACT

 

photo: Richard Kaplan

 

Tell Me More About the New SAT & ACT

THE NEW SAT

Divided into 4 Sections, plus an essay response:
  • Reading: 52 questions, 65 minutes
  • Writing and Language: 44 questions, 35 minutes
  • Math Test, No Calculator: 20 questions, 25 minutes
  • Math Test, Calculator: 38 questions, 55 minutes
  • Optional Essay: 50 minutes
Scoring:
Scoring has changed! In its attempt to emulate the ACT as closely as possible, the College Board has eliminated the penalty for guessing in the SAT. The overall score is now two scores of 800 for a total of 1600.

Reading and Writing Section:
  • Scores between 200-800 points
  • The number of questions you answer correctly correlates to a raw score chart unique to each test
  • The separate Reading and Writing scaled scores are added together and multiplied by 10. This is your total Reading and Writing Score
Math Section
  • Scores between 200-800 points
  • The number of questions you answer correctly (raw score) correlates to a scaled score chart unique to each test
  • The Math scaled score is multiplied by 10. This is your Total Math Score
Optional Essay
  • Two different people will read and score your essay.
  • Each scorer awards 1–4 points for each dimension: reading, analysis, and writing.
  • The two scores for each dimension are added.
  • You’ll receive three scores for the SAT Essay — one for each dimension — ranging from 2–8 points.  There is no composite for this section (the three scores are provided for individual assessment and are not added together).

THE ACT
Divided into 4 sections, with an optional 5th:

  • English: 75 questions, 45 minutes
  • Mathematics: 60 questions, 60 minutes
  • Reading: 40 questions, 35 minutes
  • Science: 40 questions, 35 minutes
Scoring:
Each section is scored on a 36-point scale, where the raw score is matched against a scaled score out of 36.

Optional Essay:
  • Two different people will read and score your essay on a range of 1-6, which will be added together, on 4 different areas
  • Four domain scores from 2-12:
    • Ideas and Analysis
    • Development and Support
    • Organization
    • Language Use and Conventions
Your score will be the rounded average of the four domain scores for a single subject score between 2-12.
Learn more about Test Prep with IVY

Tutor Profile!

Justin Swibel is a data-driven tutor focused on setting goals, instilling confidence, and providing each pupil with problem-solving tools necessary for achieving his or her goals. He has four years of intensive experience tutoring SAT, ACT, College Admissions, and high school entrance exams. His students consistently demonstrate drastic score increases averaging between 30 and 60 percent, cumulatively. Justin grew up near Chicago and graduated with high honors from NYU in 2005, with a BFA in Film/TV Production and a minor in Classics. His debut feature film, MODERN MAN (2006), a loose adaptation of Thoreau’s WALDEN, was praised by The New York Times as “a droll parable of mankind at ease after having subdued nature, yet still not feeling in control of it.”

 Testimonial!

“We have enjoyed the SAT tutoring and our daughter’s performance has vastly improved with your help—you made her dig deeper. We appreciate your help, feedback, time, thought, and overall generosity.  And you’re a nice guy— what a great combination!”
-Parent of 11th grader
 
Come in for a free test!   Use code: FIRSTTEST17

Visiting Colleges: A National Journey

collegeahead

It seems at this point in my college process, I think of the states not by name, but by what colleges I’ve visited. So instead of Ohio, Maryland, Vermont, Massachusettes and California; its Oberlin, Kenyon, Johns Hopkins, Goucher, Middlebury, University of Vermont, Wheaton, Pitzer and Occidental to name only a few. Continue reading

Entering the Common App: The College Admissions Process

graduation

Well, it has finally begun. After three years of college being no more than a hypothetical for me, the common app has finally kickstarted the very real college admissions process. It’s somewhat terrifying to go into a virtual pen with hundreds of thousands of other students armed only with a few numbers, a list of activities, and a 650-word essay that is supposed to define who I am as a person.

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The SAT and Me: A tutoring Experience

Who knew three letters could engender (SAT word guys) so much fear in 11th graders nationwide? The SAT, bane of almost every junior in high school’s existence; the monster under our beds, and the test emphasized by almost everyone as one of the most important days of your school career. And as I soon learned, a completely learnable test.

SAT test

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Making the Switch: My Private to Public School Transition; the SHSAT Journey

shsat journey

I had been in a private school setting all my life. Since the age of 5 I was situated at a K-12 manhattan private school where the teachers were called by their first names, where creative writing was a department by itself, and where classes were as small as 8 students to a teacher. I hadn’t considered — or even thought about — any kind of schooling other than the education I had received for nine years. But soon the benign elementary years fell to the more vicious middle school era, and after a few years in an environment where I felt increasingly isolated, I decided to look for other education options.

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The Waiting Game

It’s April, and for many high school seniors, that means that the highly anticipated finale to the college admissions saga is just around the corner. But when that big, thick envelope arrives – the one that means yes – students might find themselves a bit surprised by what’s inside. Increasingly, according to a recent article in the New York Times, colleges are inviting students to wait a little longer and enroll in the spring. If you find yourself in those shoes, it is important to keep in mind that schools have all kinds of reasons for admitting students late. Moreover, many schools have implemented special programs for springtime latecomers that may end up putting them at an advantage over the average fall starter.

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Abstract Math Concepts Start in 6th Grade

We love getting calls from the parents of 6th and 7th graders (and not because we charge less when tutors work with younger students on more simple concepts)! It’s because we know that many of the important concepts learned in middle school will take the student through high school. And if these concepts are not well mastered at this early stage, later material will seem impossible. Let’s talk today about math.

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Anything to get the ‘A’?

In light of the recent cheating scandal at Stuyvesant H.S., many schools are starting to discuss and perhaps re-evaluate the emphasis placed on testing in schools and the pressure many teenagers feel to get an A, at any cost. We at Ivy League Tutors Network understand those pressures all to well. As alumni of Stuyvesant H.S. and Bronx Science, Lisa and I empathize with the anxiety and uncertainty often involved with attending a specialized high school.

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