Visiting Colleges: A National Journey

collegeahead

It seems at this point in my college process, I think of the states not by name, but by what colleges I’ve visited. So instead of Ohio, Maryland, Vermont, Massachusettes and California; its Oberlin, Kenyon, Johns Hopkins, Goucher, Middlebury, University of Vermont, Wheaton, Pitzer and Occidental to name only a few. Continue reading

Entering the Common App: The College Admissions Process

graduation

Well, it has finally begun. After three years of college being no more than a hypothetical for me, the common app has finally kickstarted the very real college admissions process. It’s somewhat terrifying to go into a virtual pen with hundreds of thousands of other students armed only with a few numbers, a list of activities, and a 650-word essay that is supposed to define who I am as a person.

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The SAT and Me: A tutoring Experience

Who knew three letters could engender (SAT word guys) so much fear in 11th graders nationwide? The SAT, bane of almost every junior in high school’s existence; the monster under our beds, and the test emphasized by almost everyone as one of the most important days of your school career. And as I soon learned, a completely learnable test.

SAT test

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What’s that sound? Ivy League Tutors Network joins Twitter.

It seems Ivy League Tutors is stumbling into the new age of social media. That’s right, we have a twitter account. If you’re ever looking for some interesting education related articles, news about ILTN, or pictures of our mascot Fifi the bowl cat, check in at http://twitter.com/Ivytutorsnet for all the latest.

Ivy League Tutors Network's mascot

Of all the comfortable places in our office where Fifi could get her daily 20 hours of sleep, she prefers this mixing bowl. We think it is the cutest thing. Stay tuned for more about Fifi-the-bowl-cat’s work day!

Making the Switch: My Private to Public School Transition; the SHSAT Journey

shsat journey

I had been in a private school setting all my life. Since the age of 5 I was situated at a K-12 manhattan private school where the teachers were called by their first names, where creative writing was a department by itself, and where classes were as small as 8 students to a teacher. I hadn’t considered — or even thought about — any kind of schooling other than the education I had received for nine years. But soon the benign elementary years fell to the more vicious middle school era, and after a few years in an environment where I felt increasingly isolated, I decided to look for other education options.

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